Fly from Here

Title Fly from Here
Artist Yes
Released
Type Studio

Track list

  1. Fly From Here—Overture 1:53
  2. Fly From Here—Pt I: We Can Fly 6:00
  3. Fly From Here—Pt II: Sad Night at the Airfield 6:41
  4. Fly From Here—Pt III: Madman at the Screens 5:16
  5. Fly From Here—Pt IV: Bumpy Ride 2:15
  6. Fly From Here—Pt V: We Can Fly (Reprise) 1:44
  7. The Man You Always Wanted Me to Be 5:07
  8. Life on a Film Set 5:01
  9. Hour of Need 3:07
  10. Solitaire 3:30
  11. Into the Storm 6:54

Credits

Supporting credits

  • Gerrad Johnson – Piano (7)
  • Luís Jardim – Percussion
  • Oliver Wakeman – Additional Keyboards (2, 6 and 9)
  • Trevor Horn – Additional Backing Vocals, and Keyboards

About the album

Fly from Here is the twentieth studio album by Yes, and was released in 2011. It marks the longest period between Yes albums with a ten year gap between it and the previous album, Magnification. It is the only Yes studio album to feature vocalist Benoît David, and the first on which Geoff Downes performs in over 30 years. It is also only the second album on which Jon Anderson does not sing, following Drama in 1980.

The album performed better on a commercial level than many of its predecessors, reaching #30 in the UK charts, and #36 in the US Billboard 200 during a chart stay of two weeks. This makes it the most successful Yes album since Talk in 1994.

Vocalist David joined Yes in 2008 after Anderson was forced to leave due to health issues. Anderson had experienced respiratory problems whilst touring, causing several concerts to be cancelled, and the rest of the band decided to continue without him. David had previously been the vocalist in Canadian tribute band Close to the Edge, and is also the lead singer for Mystery.

When Downes and Trevor Horn joined Yes in 1980 they brought with them a demo of a track they had penned for The Buggles. This demo was entitled Fly from Here, and was worked on by the band, however it never made it to the album Drama. It was performed live during the supporting tour though, and appears on the live album The Word is Live. This rough version was expanded following the band’s split, when Downes and Horn reformed The Buggles, however it was not included on the second Buggles album either, finally appearing on the 2010 reissue of Adventures in Modern Recording as a bonus track. These two demos, and a third which has yet to be released, formed the basis of the tracks Fly from Here, Sad Night at the Airfield, and Madman at the Screens, which all appear on this album. The entire Fly from Here suite was expanded into the 25 minute epic that takes up most of the album, the first to do so in 15 years.

Horn, who was producing the album, suggested to the band that they should invite Downes to contribute to it, as it was him who had originally composed much of the Fly from Here demos, so bringing him into the fold would give the band more legitimacy. Up until this point, the keyboardist for the band had been Oliver Wakeman, who had already contributed to the writing and recording of the album, and can be heard on Fly from Here, Fly from Here (Reprise), and Hour of Need.

The track Life on a Film Set is another based on a Buggles demo. The demo Riding a Tiger was first released as a bonus track on the 2010 reissue of Adventures in Modern Recording.

The Man You Always Wanted Me to Be is the second track recorded by Yes on which Chris Squire performs the role of lead vocalist. This makes Fly from Here the second album in a row on which Squire sings lead vocals as he also performed this duty for Can You Imagine on Magnification.

The album cover for Fly from Here features a painting by Roger Dean. The painting was originally began in the 1970s, however it remained unfinished. Dean completed the painting for the album in the style of his current works, but with colours and texture of the original remaining. It features a waterfall and forest scene with a large bird of prey chasing a smaller tropical bird.

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